Computation and Neural
Systems

Electrical Engineering


Jehoshua Bruck

Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of
Computation and Neural Systems
& Electrical Engineering

Caltech
MS 136-93
Pasadena, CA 91125

Office: Moore Building, room 331
Phone: (626) 395-4852
Email: email address

Jehoshua (Shuki) Bruck is the Gordon and Betty Moore Professor of Computation and Neural Systems and Electrical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He was the founding Director of the Caltech Information Science and Technology (IST) program.

His research combines work on the design of distributed information systems and the theoretical study of biological circuits and systems. Please see the Paradise web page for details on his research group and recent (and old) technical reports.

He received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Technion, , Israel Institute of Technology, in 1982 and 1985, respectively and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1989.

Dr. Bruck has extensive industrial experience, including working with IBM Research where he participated in the design and implementation of the first IBM parallel computer. He was a co-founder and Chairman of Rainfinity (acquired in 2005 by EMC), a spin-off company from Caltech that has created the first virtualization solution for Network Attached Storage. He was a co-founder and Chairman of XtremIO (acquired in 2012 by EMC), a start-up company that has created the first scalable all-flash enterprise storage system.

Dr. Bruck is a Fellow of the IEEE, a recipient of the Feynman Prize for Excellence in Teaching, a Sloan Research Fellowship, a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award, an IBM Outstanding Innovation Award and an IBM Outstanding Technical Achievement Award.

He published more than 250 journal and conference papers and he holds more than 30 US patents. His papers were recognized in journals and conferences, including, winning the 2010 IEEE Communications Society best student paper award in Signal Processing and Coding for Data Storage for the paper on codes for limited-magnitude errors in flash memories; the 2009 IEEE Communications Society best paper award in Signal Processing and Coding for Data Storage for his paper on rank modulation for flash memories; the 2005 A. Schelkunoff Transactions prize paper award from the IEEE Antennas and Propagation society for his paper on signal propagation in wireless networks; and the Best Paper Award in the 2003 Design Automation Conference for his paper on cyclic combinational circuits.